Lectures and Events archive 2009/13

PAST EVENTS

COMING SOON!

JUNE 2015

Sunday 14th June, 10am to 5pm
OPEN SQUARE GARDENS WEEKEND
At the Museum of the Order of St John

On 14th June the Museum of the Order of St John will be participating for the first time in the acclaimed Open Square Gardens Weekend. As a part of the 2010 redevelopment of the Museum of the Order of St John, the Cloister Garden was re-landscaped and planted with medicinal plants and herbs to reflect the work of the Knights Hospitaller and to call to mind the former gardens of the medieval Clerkenwell Priory.

Highlights of the garden include towering cardoons, beautiful scents, architecture ancient and modern, and fascinating connections to the past. Something for all the family, the Museum’s new Garden Children’s Trail will be launched at this Open Square event.

This event also features the following talk by the curator of the Old Operating Theatre Museum, which will take place in St John's garden.


The Herbal Sanctuary
2pm with Karen Howell,
Curator of the Old Operating Theatre Museum

With hands on herbal materials and including a demonstration of poultice and pill making, this 1 hour herbal talk explores 2000 years of the medicinal history of plants, animals and minerals and their use in hospital treatments. A chronology of pharmaceutical history begins with Frankincense, Myrrh and roses and the medicines of ancient Egyptian and Roman cultures, and leads into the unusual medicinal materials in use in early modern London.


http://www.opensquares.org/index.html
http://www.museumstjohn.org.uk/
http://www.thegarret.org.uk

 

JULY 2015

6.30pm July 8th

Royal College of Pathologists

VIRTUAL AUTOPSY
DEATH OF A KING


The remains of Richard III were discovered in a Leicester car park in 2012 and recently reinterred in Leicester Cathedral. Forensic tests identified the body as Richard's 'beyond reasonable doubt'.

Join award-winning pathologist Dr Suzy Lishman to learn more about how this conclusion was reached and discover what a modern-day post mortem examination might have uncovered. With the help of a live model, Dr Lishman will explore what Richard's body might tell us about how he lived and died.

Please contact the museum for further details or Book via eventbrite:

http://www.eventbrite.com/e/death-of-a-king-tickets-17225761717


 

THE 200th ANNIVERSARY OF THE BATTLE OF WATERLOO, (JUNE 1815)

July 16th at 6.30 for 7pm

WATERLOO TEETH
Resurrection Men and the Trade in Real Human Teeth

In the late 18th and early 19th century, a trip to the 'dentist' was a basic and painful experience and many mouths were were rotten and empty. However, a beautiful smile was still fashionable and desireable. With tooth transplantation being an experimental science at best, and sets of porcelain false teeth being wildly expensive, what could be the answer to the problem?

Assistant Curator Kirsty Chilton reveals how teeth taken from the mouths of the dead on the battlefields of the Penninsular or the burial grounds of London could be sold to dentists and turned into sets of false teeth, an opportunistic trade which could be worth a small fortune to a wise bodysnatcher...

Please contact the museum for further details on 0208 188 2679

 

Thursday 12th February at 6.30 for 7pm

A NIGHT WITH VENUS -
A LIFETIME ON MERCURY

A talk by the author of 'The Pox', Kevin Brown

Something different for you and your loved one as you prepare for Valentine’s Day? Come and hear how in the eighteenth century and earlier, just one night of love in the arms of Venus could lead to a lifetime with Mercury, a painful treatment for the dreaded pox or syphilis. Find out where this loathsome disease originated from in the sixteenth century and the variety of painful treatments available for it in the Georgian age when the cure could indeed often be worse than the disease itself.

Discover why the actress Sarah Siddons became a ‘ball of resentment’, how Casanova tried to avoid catching the pox, how James Boswell somehow never managed to avoid infection, why the distinguished surgeon John Hunter deliberately infected himself with gonorrhoea only to go down with syphilis, and how King George II came to die on his stool not on the throne.


A talk by Kevin Brown, Trust Archivist at Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, Curator of the Alexander Fleming Laboratory Museum and author of books such as Penicillin Man (2004), The Pox: the Life and Near Death of a Very Social Disease (2006) or Poxed and Scurvied: The Story of Sickness and Health at Sea (2011).

 

27th August at 7pm

Henry VIII:
Disease, divorce and treason

Henry VIII is one of England’s most recognised and popular monarchs. We are fascinated by his wives, his palaces and his battleships. But how did Henry’s health shape the course of his life?

What turned him from a young, athletic prince into an overweight tyrant?

 

 

AUTUMN HALF TERM
FAMILY WORKSHOP

MALADIES & MEDICINES

Pills, Poultices and Poisons

Oct Tue 28th & Thu 30th at 2pm

This summer discover some of the curious 'cures' that were used to treat a wide range of maladies in one of London's oldest hospital. This family activity workshop will explore some of skills necessary to qualify as a 19th century surgeon- apothecary.

 

The Surgeon's Apprentice

Wednesday 9th Oct at 2pm

Do you know your anatomy? Can you dress a wound?
Come to the Old Operating Theatre to learn how to train to become a surgeon in the 19th century. A talk and workshop for all the family.

 

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The Museum also offers a number of trails around the museum
to explore all the exciting exhibits.

Earn your 'badge of honour'!

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COMING SOON

VIRTUAL AUTOPSY

The Pathology of
Plague and Persistence

Thursday 6th November

200 million deaths but not one autopsy:a modern pathologist’s view

of the Black Death

In the fourteenth century bubonic plague wiped out half the population of Europe.
Doctors had no idea what caused it or how to treat
or prevent the spread of the disease.

Join pathologist Dr Suzy Lishman as she performs a virtual autopsy on a live model to investigate the effects of the plague on the body
and explores how modern pathologists would have dealt with the outbreak.
Find out what an autopsy involves and how post mortem examinations
have transformed our understanding of disease.

 

Thursday 2nd October at 6.30 for 7pm

Agony and Advancement -
Surgery in the Enlightenment


http://wellcomeimages.org/

In the Age of Enlightenment, increasing emphasis on scientific practice lead to improvements to existing operations and the development of many new techniques. These included developments in cutting for the stone, trephining, eye surgery and reconstructive surgery and the emergence of surgery on the circulatory system. And yet, without anaesthesia, these operations were still performed on conscious patients and surgery continued to be a bloody and agonising experience for the patients.

A talk on the rise of scientific surgery, as it was performed by some of the greatest surgeons of the enlightenment, men whose personal and professional ambitions and energy shaped 18th century surgery, including William Cheselden, Percival Pott and the great John Hunter himself, and of the reality of surgery in the Georgian age.

£6.50, £5.00 concessions

Over 12s, Booking is essential as space is limited. Please contact the museum to book or for further details

 

Thursday 16th October at 6.30 for 7pm

"Taking the Air"

Phlogiston and Laughing Gas

This talk celebrates Ether Day, the first successful demonstration of anaesthesia in Boston on 16th October 1846.The Georgian era saw immense advances in scientific development and discovery.

Without the work of man like Joseph Priestley or Humphrey Davy on gasses and air, one of the biggest medical advances and basis for modern surgery might not have been discovered - Anaesthesia

 

Thursday 13th November at 6.30 for 7pm

"Things for the Surgeon"
The Body Snatchers of Georgian London

http://wellcomeimages.org/

As the Georgian age began, the surgeons and surgical students of London were increasingly unwilling to just watch anatomies. They wanted to dissect for themselves. But with people unwilling to donate their bodies and the legal supplies of corpses limited, where could the surgeons get their subjects from?

Someone was waiting in the shadow...

Enter the professional Resurrection Men, who crept into the London burial grounds at night and raised the dead to supply the dissecting rooms of London's flourishing medical schools. Hear the stories of some of the body snatchers, learn some of the tricks of the their trade and how much a body was worth, and discover what happened when the appetite for anatomical subjects ended with murder.

£6.50, £5.00 concessions

Over 12s, Booking is essential as space is limited. Please contact the museum to book or for further details

___________________________________________________________

Hands On
The LMoHM joint museum handling session at Barts Pathology Museum

Monday 17 November 2014 2:00pm


The London Museums of Health and Medicine is hosting a free drop-in museum object handling session featuring items from a range of London's medical museums.

Expert staff from ten of the collections that go to make up the LMoHM group will be together in one room to interpret the objects for you and a wide range of health topics will be covered. Participating museums include (in alphabetical order) Barts Pathology Museum, Bethlem Museum of the Mind, British Red Cross Museum, College of Optometrists (British Optical Association Museum), Old Operating Theatre, Royal College of Physicians, Royal College of Surgeons, Science Museum, St. Bartholomew's Hospital Museum and the Wellcome Library.

Visitors to 'Hands On' can expect to see and touch, amongst other things, model body parts and bodily prosthetics, surgical instruments, and diagnostic equipment. Try on some old spectacles or acquire some surgical skills by turning your hand (or arm) to our interactive suturing activity.

The event will be held at Barts Pathology Museum on the afternoon of Monday 17th November between 2pm and 5pm.This will also be an excellent opportunity for many people to see the Barts Pathology Museum itself, which has only limited public opening at the moment. As a further reason to come the hospital’s own exhibition, the St Bartholomew's Hospital Museum, showcasing its 900-year history, and housed on the same site as the Pathology Museum, will also be open specially even though it would normally be closed on a Monday.

The event will be followed that evening by the first public lecture to be delivered under the group banner. Simon Chaplin, Director of the Wellcome Library and a former Senior Curator of the Hunterian Museum will commence what we hope may become a series of annual lectures on aspects of medical history as transmitted via medical museums.

Simon's lecture title will be entitled:

'From Alchemy to Zingiberales: exploring London's medical museums'

There are limited lecture tickets available. Places (if still available) may be booked online at http://www.bartslmohm.eventbrite.co.uk

No tickets are required for the 'Hands On' handling session but visitors will be required to register on arrival.

We hope that anyone with an interest in medical history will wish to attend one or both events.

Venue Details:

Barts Pathology Museum
3rd Floor,
Robin Brook Centre,
West Smithfield,
London
EC1A 7BE
http://www.qmul.ac.uk/bartspathology/

 

OCTOBER LUNCH TIME TALKS

Anatomy of Performance Training
13th - 17th Oct 2014, 1.00pm-2.00pm

Monday13th October – Hand
Tuesday 14th October – Foot
Wednesday 15th October – Mouth
Thursday 16th October – Heart
Friday 17th October – Ear

These talks coincide with the launch of his new book, Methuen Drama and the Old Operating Theatre & Herb Garret (9a St Thomas St, London, SEI 9RY) are hosting Dr John Matthews (Plymouth University) to give a series of public lectures this October. Each lecture examines the practical and symbolic uses of a different body part in the practices, politics and philosophy of performance training

Each lecture will be accompanied by a screening of an original, corresponding digital art-film made by Siobhan Mckeown alongside the book for Methuen Drama Online.

Entry is free and by booking only. Entry to these talks also gives free admission to the Old Operating Theatre Museum & Herb Garret. Places are limited and so please contact Siobhan via anatomyofperformancetraining@gmail.com and specify the date or dates you plan on attending.

More about Anatomy of Performance Training:

We train because we are human and we become human because we train.

This is the surprising and original conclusion of Anatomy of Performance Training, in which Matthews shows how training is a very human response to the problems of having a body and living in the world.

Using illustrative case-studies of professional practice, each chapter addresses a specific body part, offering a self-contained discussion of its symbolic and practical significance in the artistic, and commercial, activities of training. These anatomical case-studies are cross-referenced with other disciplines (such as sport, high diving, deep diving and artisan craft) to further expand our understanding of performance. Stand-alone chapters, ideal for reference, build towards an overall conclusion that the uniquely human practice of training is emerging as a new and pervasive ideology globally.

Ideal for readers seeking to understand the relationship the body has with the theatre and training, or for teachers looking for a new, innovative approach to performance, Anatomy of Performance Training is an accessible, original contribution to the philosophy of training for performance.


anatomyofperformancetraining.tumblr.com
facebook.com/anatomyofperformancetrainingbook

Museums at Night 2014:

"Night of The Bodysnatcher"

16 May 2014 , 7.30pm.SOLD OUT!

Thoughout the 18th and early 19th century, surgeons and their students sought increased access to anatomy. But with legal supplies of corpses limited, where could they get their subjects from?

A talk in the dark atmosphere of the Old Operating Theatre on the gruesome profession of the Resurrectionists, the men who supplied the dissecting rooms of London from the graves of the city, the tricks of the their trade and the stories of their gruesome work.

Someone is waiting in the shadow...

HALF TERM EVENTS MAY 2014

****** booking highly recommended ******

Tuesday 27 May 2014, 2pm
The Surgeon's Apprentice

Come and hear all about 19th medical students, learn your anatomy
and how to become a successful surgeon.

Speed is at the essence!

Wednesday 28 May 2014, 2pm
Victorian Surgery

In the early 19th century, the patients' only relieve from pain was
the speed of the surgeon's knife...

A real amputation kit awaits!
HOW WILL YOU SURVIVE?

Thursday 29 May 2014
Victorian A&E

The year is 1840 and Southwark has become one of the dirtiest,
smelliest, most impoverish and overpopulated districts of London. Coming
from the countryside you are unaccustomed to the thick smog and the
squallor that surrounds you. It won't be long before you succumb to
any one of the many contagious deadly diseases
that were rife inVictorian London.

As a poor sick person where do you turn?
To St Thomas's Hospital's A&E!

TALK & WALK £13.95 ( 2 adults & 1/2 children) £8.50 (1 adult & 1 child)
BOOKING ESSENTIAL FOR THIS EVENT

 

Art Exhibition

 

 

NOVEMBER & DECEMBER

 

Christmas special talk sat 14th at 4pm

"Garret, Frankincense and Myrrh"

We're having a wonderful Christmas talk by our curator Karen Howell just before our holiday closure with a little celebration in the garret. On Saturday 14th of December at 4pm. Included in the museum admission charge.

Booking is advised as usual!

 

Friday November 15th & December 13th from 6.30pm - 8pm, doors open at 6pm

A VERY SPECIAL EVENT

with Mike Coffey, the London Magician

Twenty people in a room, for the most part strangers to each other, some perhaps strangers to themselves. A soiree of sorts, but one held with clear intent. One where dreams are nurtured and imagination given free reign. On this night it's faith, not logic, that's the key for the lock. On this night it's faith that lends substance. Your host is a conjuror of uncertain repute.

There will be wine and convivial company.

Also the changing, influencing and reading of minds, past life regression, mediumistic manifestations and talking with the dead.

And magic.

Always magic.

£30, please contact the Museum for further details.

more info at http://www.exsilva.com/

Booking is essential as the event is limited to only 20 people!

 

THE EVENT IS SOLD OUT BUT WE ARE TAKING NAMES FOR WAITING LIST

 

 

 

 

 

'Creepy Victorians: After-death photography

24th October at 6.30 pm, tickets £7

EVENT SOLD OUT!

In case of sudden death the Victorians resorted to the rather creepy habit of having a photograph of the deceased taken after death. Post-mortem photography was also used for the documentation of victims of violent crimes, such as the victims of Jack the Ripper. Dr Anastasia Tsaliki (archaeologist & anthropologist) and Valentina Lari (photographer & film-maker) will explore the challenges posed by post-mortem photography through a selection of such photographs and the point of view of a modern professional regarding the photography of sensitive subjects, such as death and human remains.

Please be advised that you may find some of the images disturbing.

Anastasia Tsaliki is a Greek born scientist based in London. She was awarded her PhD in Biological and Funerary Archaeology and Anthropology at the University of Durham and she has extensive research and teaching experience. Her research interests include the multidisciplinary study of burial customs, deviancy and marginality. http://bioarchaeology-palaeopathology.blogspot.com".

Valentina Lari is an Italian born artist based in UK who works with mixed media. Using film and 35mm photography she explores the ideas of loss and the poetry of the macabre. A member of the curatorial team at The Old Operating Theatre Museum, her most recent work has been inspired by medical science. Her latest film "The Deformity of Beauty" was made in collaboration with the Mütter Museum, photographing and filming its world renown pathological collection. www.valentinalari.co.uk 

 

 

SEPTEMBER

 

'Bad Deaths’ in Victorian Britain: What about pain?
Thu 12th Sept

time & additional details coming soon


The Victorian imagination was replete with references to death and dying. What was a ‘bad death’ according to the Victorians? How did it differ from a ‘good death’? These and other questions will be explored through a consideration of Victorian visual representations of death. This lecture will look at the troubling issues surrounding dissection, suicide and infanticide, before examining the complex relationship between pain and bad deaths during the nineteenth century. Chronic illness will be addressed along with the role of the hospital and hospice. The potential consolations of pain relief and religion will also be considered. Finally, contemporary ideas surrounding bad deaths will be discussed in relation to their Victorian antecedents: what constitutes a bad death today? And are our attitudes so very different from those of our nineteenth century forebears?


This lecture will be given by Dr Carmen Mangion, an author, researcher and cultural and social historian at Birkbeck College, University of London.

A History of Pathology in 50 Objects

 

Wednesday 25 September, 6.30 for 7pm

The Old operating Theatre, St Thomas’ Street, London.

Entry - £6.20

 

Pathology is the science behind the cure, with over 70% of all medical diagnoses involving pathology. To celebrate its fiftieth anniversary, the Royal College of Pathologists asked its members to nominate the objects that they thought had made the largest contribution to modern healthcare to create a book entitled ‘A History of Pathology in 50 Objects’. This lecture series will celebrate some of the objects which were deemed most significant.

Join pathologist Dr Suzy Lishman as she explores a selection of the objects, including historical examples from the museum collection. If you've ever wondered how vaccinations were developed, why blood is stored in plastic bags, how autopsy instruments have changed over the years or when treatment for diabetes became available, you'll find all the answers at this event.

Victorian A & E:

Curing and Caring London's sick poor

August , Thu 22nd, Mon 2nd at 2pm


Visit the Old Operating Theatre this Summer and discover  the difficulties surrounding St Thomas' hospital admission in the 19th century. Traditionally, hospitals were established as charitable institutions primarily to treat poor people who were unable to meet the hefty fees charged by private physicians. However, unlike today, accessing medical aid was not so easy. Only a particular type of person suffering from a particular kind of illness would be allowed entry. Through role play, this family based workshop will explore some common aliments suffered by Victorian Londoner's and discuss  why only a limited few would be successful in obtaining a 'cure'. 

 

 

 

 

Medicine at Sea

 

MAY

MUSEUMS AT NIGHT 2013

Friday 17 May 2013

6pm, 7pm, 8pm 

SURGERY BY GASLIGHT & OTHER MEDICAL TALES


Experience the fear and the emotion of a patient in the 19th century - come and have your leg amputated in the oldest surviving operating theatre in England. When the light gets dim ... the surgery comes alive!   Family friendly

Booking Essential

 

Wednesday 29 May 2013, start 6.30pm

The Pathologists'

Hunt for the Hidden Killer

The dose taken is often all that separates a useful medicine from a deadly poison. Before the days of clinical trials and accurate laboratory tests, poisoning was a common cause of death. Poisons were sometimes taken in the mistaken belief that they would cure disease or were administered secretly by a third party with more sinister motives. A third category of poisoning became common in the nineteenth century - accidental poisoning by objects in the home. A new middle class emerged following the industrial revolution, with a large number of people having disposable income and opportunities for leisure activities for the first time. People decorated their homes and themselves with brightly coloured textiles but  there was deadly poison in their new wallpapers and pretty dresses. Find out more about one of the hidden killers in the Victorian home from pathologist Dr Suzy Lishman. With the help of a live model, Dr Lishman will describe what an autopsy involves and what signs the pathologist would look for to diagnose death from poisoning.

JUNE

Wed 19th and Thu 20th June at 6.30

"DELIRIUM"


It is estimated that up to 80% of people being treated in intensive care experience delirium; the bulk of these will hallucinate.

Delirium is a series of songs about hallucinations in intensive care, written by Victoria Hume and based on interviews with people who have been through this extraordinary experience, and with the staff who care for them.

-- £10 including refreshments

booking is essential- for booking and ticketing information contact info@victoriahume.com

 

SE

VALENTINE'S MUSEUM TRAILS

"Here is My Heart Don't Break It"  for adults

"Our Blood- Trail for Young Hearts" for children

 

Friday 8th February 2013

 

lucas project event poster

 

SATURDAY OCTOBER 27th

CELEBRATE OUR 50th ANNIVERSARY WITH US! free entry

Following restoration, the Old Operating Theatre and Herb Garret of the old St Thomas Hospital opened on 27 October 1962, making the museum 50 years old on 27 October 2012. The museum is offering free admission to celebrate.

Surgical demonstrations will take place on the hour, every hour from 11am to 4pmm.

 


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HALF TERM HALLOWEEN

Monday 29th October and Friday 2nd of November at 2pm

BREAK YOUR LEG AND DIE!

In the early 19th century, a patient’s only relief from agony was the speed of the surgeon’s knife...A real amputation kit awaits...!

HOW WILL YOU SURVIVE?

 

Wednesday 31st October at 2pm

THE SURGEON'S APPRENTICE

With a workshop for children; *'Make Your Own Cut Out Kit!'*

Operations in the Old Operating Theatre had an audience of medical students!Learn all about the hospital pupils of the 19th century and the surgery they were learning to perform

Thursday November 1st at 2pm

A PLAGUE ON YOUR HOUSE!

Explore one of the most fearsome infections in history! A tale of Rats, Fleas, Buboes and Quacks!

 

Sunday 4th November at 2pm

BODYSNATCHERS (12 +)

But where could they get fresh bodies from?

Discover how this gruesome profession developed and hear some of the stories of London’s Resurrection Men!

Space is limited and booking is recommended for all talks.


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Thursday 22nd November, p.m, time and price to be announced

THE GOLDEN AGE

A poetry performance with‘The Fire Poet’ Phillip Wells

"the foremost performance poet in England" - EVENING STANDARD


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Death and Mourning in Victorian England

by by Sarah Tobias arah Tobias
Friday 23rd of Nov at 6.30pm £6 £5 conc


Illustrated talk on how Victorians mourned their dead. Fascinating mourning rituals involved elaborate etiquette, distinctive clothing and long mourning periods in order to remember loved ones - two years for a widow. An entire funerary industry grew up during the Victorian period which included memorial china, jet and hair jewellery and black-bordered stationery. Sarah Tobias is a Lecturer in social & cultural history, public speaker, tour guide, dramatic narrator

 

http://sarah-tobias.blogspot.co.uk/

 

 

 

 

 

Also we would like to bring your attention to the following event:

SPECIAL EVENT AT KING'S COLLEGE

October 24th at 6pm

Organised by the Centre for the Humanities and Health at KCL

www.kcl.ac.uk/innovation/groups/chh/index.aspx

FREE

Pathology in Film:

MEMENTO MACABRE

Sketches from the Mütter Museum

“Through The Weeping Glass” by The Quay Brothers
“The Deformity of Beauty” by Valentina Lari

 

A showing of two experimental films shot and created entirely around the pathological collection of the world renowned Mütter Museum in Philadelphia, with a discussion of the process, the ethical approach and difficulties that visual artists have when working with human remains and medical institutions for a project. And, from a more strictly cinematic point of view, discuss the visual choices and solutions that were eventually chosen for the making of the films. The discussion will be led by Lilly Husbands, KC.

 

All are welcome to attend and there is no need to RSVP.  

 

Arthur and Paula Lucas Lecture Theatre (S-2.18), Strand Campus, WC2R 2LS,
Kings College University London


 

 

Fringe Zoology Exhibition

the Specimens of Alex CF

9th August - 1st September

Artist Alex CF offers the public a unique opportunity to see his bizarre crafted specimens in the atmospheric architecture of The Old Operating Theatre Museum and its wonderful herb garret.

A collection of 19th century biological specimens of species thought to be the stuff of legend, from Vampires to dragons, their preserved remains and enigmatic stories the lifes work of curator and custodian Alex CF.

     

Alex's work has been featured in a number of well-known publications both online and in print, such as Weird Tales, Bizarre, BoingBoing, and io9. His cryptozoological artifacts have also been featured on book covers, and in a number of independent films.

to find out more visit: www.alexcf.com

The exhibition is included in the price of entry to the Old Operating Theatre Museum.

 

Trepanning at the Florence Nightingale Museum

   Karen Howell, Curator of the Old Operating Theatre will be demonstrating trepanning on a model head and discussing the benefits (or otherwise). This takes place at the Florence Nightingale Museum    on Wednesday, 8 August at 13:00:00

   More details: http://www.lecturelist.org/content/view_lecture/11254?mail=y

 

FORTHCOMING EVENTS

please note: events are recommended for age 12 upwards

unless differently stated

 

APRIL & MAY SPECIAL EVENTS

 

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19th April- 17th May

TALES OF MYSTERY & MEDICINE

 

ROBERTO LARI

 

Gothic Comics on show at The Old Operating Theatre

 

Museum's opening times & admission charges

 

 

Italian illustrator and graphic novel artist

Roberto Lari exhibits a selection of his stylish

gothic stories of phantoms and amputations.

Ranging from the 70ies until now, a collection of new

and published work has finally arrived in the

dark attic of St Thomas's Church.

 

Roberto Lari

Born in Florence, Italy. Comics artist, interior designer & illustrator. During the 70s and the 80s some of his beautifully crafted comics were published by magazines and periodics, including the cult magazine Eureka, in collaboration with writer/director Max Bunker (Luciano Secchi) the creator of the internationally acclaimed Kriminal, Satanik. Alan Ford, Max Magnus.

Roberto Lari website

 

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MUSEUMS AT NIGHT

Friday 18th

SURGERY BY GASLIGHT

show at 6pm, 7pm and 8pm.

£9 full, £8 conc

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Sat 19th May

7pm

OMINOUS APPARATUS

Anatomy of an Artist:

Claire Barclay, Scottish contemporary sculptor will be working with The Old Operating Theatre Museum for a special evening tour launching the museum's 50th anniversary celebrations. Medical objects and architecture will assume another dimension through the eyes and analysis of this futuristic compelling award winning artist. A show and tell tour presenting some of the most unusual medical objects once used within this unique hospital's remains.

 

physician spoon

Claire Barclay is one of the exciting new generation of Scottish artists who came out of the Glasgow School of Art in the 1990s. She produces beautiful sculptural installations with a balance of elements contrasting function and dysfunction, chaos and order. One of her key influences is an ongoing fascination with historical and anthropological artefacts.

 

Free but booking is essential

 

Thank You for voting!

 

 

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Thursday 10th May

 

6.30pm

 

 

SOLD OUT

 

AUTOPSY: THE FINAL

OPERATION

 

As part of National Pathology Year 2012 we are collaborating with the Royal College of Pathologists to bring you “Autopsy: The Final Operation”.As well as operating on the living, doctors have always examined the dead to find out more about how the body works and what can go wrong. This is your chance to find out what an autopsy involves and how it has changed over the centuries. You can meet a real pathologist and even handle some of the instruments they use. Join us to find out what doctors can learn from the dead – and how this can help the living.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tickets £6.00.

 

 

Early booking is advised as this event has proved very popular in past years.

 

 

Feedback from this event last year:

''This was an excellent event – very interesting and enjoyable”

''I loved how interactive it was” ''Thank you for an amazing time''

 

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* EASTER *

 

Family Day Events

 

 

Mon 2nd, 9th April 11pm

Break Your Leg And Die! 

A Demonstration of Georgian and Victorian Surgery

The Amputation Kit awaits...HOW WILL YOU SURVIVE? 

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Wed 4th, 11th April 11am

The Surgeon's Apprentice

'Make Your Own Cut Out Kit!' 

Performed in the original wooden operating theatre.

 

Surgery and the Victorian Hospital

Hear what happened behind Victorian hospital walls and see a demonstration of Victorian Surgery.

 

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Easter Sun 8th April 2012, 2pm

Spring Tonics and Traditional Easter Herbs

An uplifting lecture for families on herbal remedies and herbs traditionally
associated with Easter. Learn about the plants that made up a
spring pottage' from the 1600s, and hear how nettles can be used to
boost your iron levels today. To include a demonstration and
(optional!) tasting.

 


Nettle tonic anyone?

 

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Sun 1st April 2012, 2pm

Bodysnatchers and Resurrectionists


Nineteenth century surgical techniques were advanced by knowledge
gained from anatomical dissection.
At a time when criminals were dissected and voluntary body donation was rare, a shortage of subjects arose.


In the darkness, over the cemetery wall, came the solution
The Bodysnatcher
Not suitable for under 12s

 

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Friday, 6th April 2012, 11am

Victorian Health Walk


The walk covers fascinating aspects of the historic development,
health history and heritage of the area.
Southwark’s location at the south end of London Bridge
has made it a key strategic development site since Roman times.

Meeting point is the museum, suitable for all ages.

£8 Booking essential

 

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Saturday 7 April 2012, 11am
King Cholera Walk

A tour of the London Bridge area incorporating the reports of the infamous diseases that threatened the lives of the working poor of London. Death by infection, death by water.

 


£8 Space is limited, booking essential

 

 

Thursday 10th May

 

6.30pm

 

 

AUTOPSY: THE FINAL

OPERATION

 

As part of National Pathology Year 2012 we are collaborating with the Royal College of Pathologists to bring you “Autopsy: The Final Operation”.As well as operating on the living, doctors have always examined the dead to find out more about how the body works and what can go wrong. This is your chance to find out what an autopsy involves and how it has changed over the centuries. You can meet a real pathologist and even handle some of the instruments they use. Join us to find out what doctors can learn from the dead – and how this can help the living.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tickets £6.00.

 

 

Early booking is advised as this event has proved very popular in past years.

 

 

Feedback from this event last year:

''This was an excellent event – very interesting and enjoyable”

''I loved how interactive it was” ''Thank you for an amazing time''

~

Tue 3rd, Thu 5th, Tue 10th, Thu 12th

April 2012 11am

A Plague on Your House!

A workshop exploring one of the most fearsome infections in history...

A tale of Rats, Fleas, Buboes and Quacks! 

Summer Events for Kids

August Tuesdays & Thursdays at 2pm

Hands On

The Apothecary's Apprentice

Discover the world of pharmacy in the 18th century. This children's workshop will explore the use and making of pills and potions in the magical atmosphere of our herb garret.

 

 

 

 

ART EXHIBITION

 

RELICS OF WHAT IS TO COME

 

A group exhibition of Morbid and Memorial Art

from Flanders and London

29th July - 28th August

 

 

 

A group of artists from London , Ghent and Antwerp who regularly work together on projects to do with Art & Science, Anatomy, Medical artand Mortality present new work in the Old Operating Theatre Museum and Herb Garret

 

PAST SPECIAL EVENTS

 

 

MAY 2011

12th of May at 6.30pm

PATHOLOGY IN MYTHOLOGY

 

Professor Robin Cooke from Queensland Medical School and Pathology will talk about some of the congenital abnormalities that may have been the basis of characters invented by the writers of mythology. Almost every civilization has developed its own body of stories that have become part of the culture and created a rich heritage of mythology.The authors of the mythological stories may have based some of their famous characterson real life congenital abnormalities that occur in humans and in animals.

The audience also will be introduce of Homer’s famous characters like Mermaids, Cyclops, conjoined twins etc. who may have been based, at least to some extent, on real cases.


The lecture will be illustrated with photos of sculptures and paintings of the mythological characters and real medical examples.

 

Professor ROBIN A. COOKE

OBE, OAM, MD, DCP, FRCPA, FRCPath, FACTM, FAICD

Brisbane, Australia

University of Queensland Medical School and Pathology Queensland.Emeritus Consultant Royal Brisbane Hospital,Queensland, Australia. Editor of International Pathology – the News Bulletin of the International Academy of Pathology

tickets £6

 

 

~

13th of May

The events will start at 6pm, 7pm and 8pm -please book for one time only

 

On popular demand we are back for

 

MUSEUMS AT NIGHT

with our

"Surgery by Gaslight"

 

Experience the fear of a nineteenth-century patient at these low-lit demonstrations of amputations that were performed in Victorian times, and rejoice that you don't really live in that era. Anaesthetic-free and pre-antiseptic. Enjoy the rare magic atmosphere of the museum in the twilight and be ready for the operating table!

 

tickets £9

 

~

 

SUMMER EVENTS!

 

EVENTS FOR FAMILIES:

 

August; Tuesday 17th & Tuesday 24th at 2pm


Sir Hans Sloane: The Odyssey of Chocolate Workshop

 

Discover the fascinating story of chocolate's long, rich history, from it's early usage by the ancient Aztecs, who drank chocolate as a bitter beverage during religious and social ceremonies, to the explosion and mass production of chocolate throughout Europe in the nineteenth century!

 

For centuries chocolate has symbolised: wealth, health and love across a diverse range of cultures as well as being the nation's favourite tasty treat of choice. The odyssey of chocolate aims to explore many aspects of the rich social significance of chocolate's history!

 

The workshop is suitable for all ages and includes sampling different variations of chocolate in it's modern form, as well as designing your own chocolate label.

 

 

Friday 13th and Friday 20th at 3pm

 

Nature Morte- Still Life In The Garret

This summer The Old Operating Theatre and Herb Garret museum will be hosting a programme of art themed workshops. Nature Morte is an educational activity that aims to use artistic practise to explore  medical artefacts. Each session will consider a range of historic objects taken from the museums handling collection and display exhibit, in an attempt  to trace the changing designs of equipment in the past two hundred year. The objective of this workshop is that by illustrating these artifacts it will enable participants with an understanding of how designs have evolved in line with medical progress.

The workshop will last just over an hour, paper and pencils will be provided by the museum. No experience of drawing is necessary and is open to all ages of children and adults.  

 

Tuesday 17th, Thursday 19th, Tuesday 24th at 12pm (noon)

 

BARBERS, BLOOD & BANDAGES
a children's interactive workshop to explore the 18th and 19th century medicine
!


What did people do before the invention of anaesthetic and antiseptic procedures?
Everyone is familiar with the red and white stripes outside of barber’s shops; but do you know what the rotating pole means?

 

*Booking is necessary for this talk and please check the programme or call for details as sometimes special events or private boolkings replace the regular talks on Saturdays.

 

 

Wed 18th, Wed 25th at 3pm and 4pm over 12 only

Gore Tour!

The House of Instruments

Hands on surgery! A tour of the museum through the instruments of the most horrible surgical procedures...

Dare to handle the harsh instruments of healing history!

 

 

Thu 26th August 3 pm over 15 only

 

The Herbs of the Dark Art- Herbs & Witchcraft

 

There has always been a strong fascinating relationship between herbs, folklore and even witchcraft in English countryside and in the rest of the world. Wise women and shamans often took the role of doctors in tribes and small rural villages using herbal remedies to cure physical and supernatural afflictions.

From the mandrake's scream to witches uguent join us for a talk on medicine & magic among the smells and spells of our atmopsheric garret.

 

 

Sunday 15th and 22nd of August

 

How Medicines Were Made From Plants

A talk and demonstration on historic herbal medicine. Learn some centuries old remedies that you can try at home!

 

 

 

Booking is strongly advised. Call 0207 188 2679

or email curator@thegarret.org.uk to reserve a place

 

 

 

EVENING LECTURES IN AUGUST

 

Thursday 12th August at 6.30 pm

"Vampires and Werewolves among us?
Legends and Scientific Reality"


by bioarcheologist and palaeopathologist Anastasia Tsaliki

 

Due to recent TV shows and films such as the Twilight Saga, there is an
increased popular interest on vampires and shape-shifters.

This talk will explore the fascinating origins and the folklore of the vampires
and the werewolves, but it will also study the reality behind these legends from
an archaeological and medical viewpoint.

Who were those accused and tried of vampirism or lycanthropy through history?
Where did they live?

Who was Dracula? Are there real vampires?

Come along to find out, but beware as this talk is not suitable for the faint-hearted and those under 15!

Over 15s £6 (no conc)

 

Enlightenment Surgery

Thursday 19th August at 6.30

William Cheselden, who could cut for the stone in 54 seconds!
Samuel Sharpe, the eye surgeon who could cut out your cataracts!


A talk about the rise of the scientific surgeon in the 18th century and the end of the Barber Surgeons Company.


Hear about some of the surgeons who joined the Royal Society and worked to elevate the status of the profession, their practice of the science of anatomy, the operations they developed and the instruments of surgery that they used.

Over 15s

£6 (no conc)

 

 

We are back again after the great success of last year!

SOLD OUT

May 15th at 6pm, 7pm, 8pm

Surgery by Gaslight & Other Medical Tales

Experience the fear and the emotion of a patient in the 19th century - come and have your leg amputated in the oldest surviving operating theatre in England.

When the light gets dim ... the surgery comes alive!

 

April 2010

EVENING LECTURES:

£10 per person (including a complimentary glass of wine)

Sir Hans Sloane: Enlightenment Surgery

Thursday 1st April 6pm-8pm

William Cheselden, who cut for the stone! Samuel Sharpe, the eye surgeon! The dissolution of the Company of Barber Surgeons and the rise of the scienific surgeon in the 18th century. Hear about some of the surgeons who joined the Royal Society and worked to elevate the staus of the profession, their practice of the science of anatomy and the operations they developed!

 

February 2010

Sunday 7th February

The Old Operating Theatre Museum at the Movies

The Museum will be projecting a series of edited highlights of short films and TV productions made in or about the Old Operating Theatre over the last 20 years.

 

It will include the amazing short film 'Unterschenkel-amputation', a 1903 film showing the speed of an amputation of a leg, courtesy of the Wellcome Library.

 

The films will be on from 1pm - 3.00pm with a break for a short talk on the Herb Garret at 2pm

THE ODYSSEY OF CHOCOLATE

In collaboration with the Royal Society's Local Heroes

 

logo

LOCAL HEROES

See further with the Royal Society in 2010 - celebrate 350 years of excellence in science

EVENTS FOR CHILDREN & FAMILIES:


Sir Hans Sloane: The Odyssey of Chocolate Workshop


Discover the fascinating story of chocolates long, rich history, from it's early usage by the ancient Aztecs, who drank chocolate as a bitter beverage during religious and social ceremonies, to the explosion and mass production of chocolate throughout Europe in the nineteenth century!

 

For centuries chocolate has symbolised: wealth: health and love across a diverse range of cultures as well as being the nations favourite tasty treat of choice. The odyssey of chocolate aims to explore many aspects of the rich social significance of chocolate's history!

 

The workshop is suitable for all ages and includes sampling the different variations of chocolate in it's modern form as well as designing your own chocolate label. The only requirement for entry; is a love of chocolate.


Sunday 14th February 2.pm

Treat yourself for Valentine's Day!


Tuesday 16th & Thursday 18th February 2pm


EVENING LECTURES:

£10 per person (including a complimentary glass of wine)

 

Sir Hans Sloane & Chocolate

Thursday 4th March 6pm-8pm

 

 

Wikipedia at the Old Operating Theatre Museum

On Sunday 28th February, the Museum is encouraging visitors to come and take interesting photographs of the Museum and the displays and to upload these to wikipedia. Details of the project and uploading can be found click here: or visit http://www.britainloveswikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page

We are also hoping visitors and supporters will update the wikipedia page

wikipedialogo

SPECIAL EVENT FOR

NATIONAL PATHOLOGY WEEK NOV 2010

see below

 

 

HORRIBLE HALLOWEEN

HALF TERM
AT THE OLD OPERATING THEATRE

 

Monday 25th, Wednesday 27th and Friday 29th October at 2pm


THE PRESSURE of the KNIFE


The amputation was one of the great capital operations a 19th century surgeon might be called upon to perform. However it was not the only one...
From cutting for the stone and eye surgery to trephining and rhinoplasty,
a talk about the many operations of the early 19th century, the skilled surgeons who performed them,
the brave patients who endured them and the eager students who watched them.

 

Tuesday 26th and Thursday 28th October at 12pm


BARBERS, BLOOD & BANDAGES


An interactive workshop for children exploring 18th and 19th century medicine!
What did people do before the invention of anaesthetic and antiseptic procedures?
Everyone is familiar with the red and white stripes outside of barber’?s shops...
but do you know what the rotating pole means?

 

Tuesday 26th October at 2pm


THE MANDRAKE:
"Would curses kill, as doth the mandrake's groan"

(King Henry VI- William Shakespeare)

A talk on the magical and mythical plant that has enchanted generations of writers and artists thoughout time. A journey through the use of Mandrake in medicine, folklore and literature, from Shakespeare to Burroughs - from Doctors to Witches.
Join us for a fascinating exploration into the history of the so-called Satan's Apple.

 

 

Tuesday 26th October 7-8pm

admission £ 3

WHOSE BLOOD:  A PLAY IN DEVELOPMENT

Come along and be part of a play in the making! Visit the historic Old Operating Theatre and see a staged reading of a new play specifically being written and developed to be performed there in early 2011. The play, Whose Blood, is the story of two Ghanaian immigrants who come to London in the 1840s, and when one of them falls sick, they come to St Thomas' Hospital where an assistant surgeon proposes a radical new solution.  Whose Blood is a play of shifting desires and allegiances, all played out in a 19th Century Operating theatre."

 


Thursday 28th October at 2pm (over 15 only)


'ONE NIGHT WITH VENUS, A LIFETIME WITH MERCURY...'


19th Century literature and medical approaches to the disease of love and lust: syphilis.
A talk introducing the impact of syphilis in literary and medical culture, exploring
the different treatments available in hospitals, and the metaphorical influence the disease had on
European writing and poetry.

 

Saturday 30th October at 2pm


BREAK YOUR LEG AND DIE?
“A patient preparing for an operation was like a condemned criminal preparing for execution.”
A demonstration of an operation without anaesthetics or antiseptics, in Britain’s only
remaining wooden 19th century Operating Theatre.
How will you survive...?

 

Halloween; Sunday 31st October at 2pm (over 12s only)


BODY SNATCHER

Thoughout the 18th and early 19th century, surgeons and their students sought increased access to anatomy.
But with legal supplies of corpses limited, where could they get their subjects from?...
A talk on the history of the professional resurrectionists, the men who supplied the dissecting rooms of London from the graves of the city, the tricks of the their trade and the stories of their gruesome work.

 


Booking is strongly advised. Call 0207 188 2679

or email curator@thegarret.org.uk to reserve a place

 

 

NOVEMBER EVENTS

 

 

 

November Thu 4th 6.30- 8pm £6 NATIONAL PATHOLOGY WEEK

AUTOPSY

The Final Operation

As well as operating on the living, doctors have always examined the dead to find out more about how the body works and what can go wrong. This is your chance to find out what an autopsy involves and how it has changed over the centuries. You can meet a real pathologist and even handle some of the instruments they use. Join us to find out what doctors can learn from the dead – and how this can help the living.

 

feedback from the public:

"This was an excellent event – very interesting and enjoyable.

I loved how interactive it was.

Thank you for an amazing time"

 

.This event is part of National Pathology Week, which is organised by the Royal College of Pathologists and sponsored by Siemens.

www.nationalpathologyweek.org

 

 

Wednesday 10t November at 6.30pm

 

DEALING WITH THE DEAD

Sentiment Versus Efficiency?

Civilizations are often judged by how they treat the living, but perhaps almost as important is how they treat the dead. This talk, given by Gordon Museum curator Bill Edwards, explores means and methods used of deposing of the dead, from Cro-Magnon man up to the present day and beyond.

 

A talk by William Edwards, curator of the Gordon Musuem of Guys's Hospital

 

 

Lectures and Events held in 2009

 

 

EXPLORING THE INVISIBILE:

New Event at The Old Operating Theatre Museum & Herb Garret

 

4th - 7th December
8th December; A talk by the artist

A unique live installation and exhibition called “Exploring the Invisible” opens on December 3rd, displaying people and objects photographed using the natural light emitted by certain strains of bacteria.

 

Bioluminescent bacteria are widely used in scientific research, usually as internal markers. By inverting this practice and employing bacteria as an external light source, objects and bodies, surfaces and skin are exposed to the soft ethereal glow of the bacteria, establishing new points of contact and visual punctures.


The project is a collaboration between artist Anne Brodie, microbiologist Dr Simon Park and curator Dr Caterina Albano. It is funded by an Engaging Science Arts Award from the Wellcome Trust.


Using a strain of bioluminescent bacteria called Photobacterium phosphoreum,

the team has produced a series of portraits of objects, including some of

Joseph Lister’s personal papers.


Lister was an early pioneer of the use of antiseptics in surgery and the connection between bacteria and infections, together with the modern application in biomedical research of the bacterial gene responsible for emitting light, made it particularly fitting that bacteria should help to shed light – quite literally – on Lister’s life and work.


Among his papers, held at the Wellcome Library, are personal letters,

sketchbooks and scientific notebooks.


The project culminates in a live installation of work within the herb garret for one night only, and human photographic projections onto the ancient operating table at

the Old Operating Theatre, St Thomas Street, London SE1.


On December 8, the team will give a talk about their work

at the Old Operating Theatre.

October Events

HALLOWEEN HALF TERM HORROR!

For All

Monday 26th October at 2pm
Mary Seacole's Medical Workshop
in the Herb Garret of the Old Operating Theatre Museum

Have a go at making Mary's remedies and try them out on yourself, if you are feeling brave!Mary's remedies included; Infusion of Sage
Mustard plasters and poultices
and Ginger Root teaAlso, guava jelly and sarsaprilla tasting!


The Witches' Kitchen
Tuesday 27th October at 2pm
& Saturday 31st October (Halloween) at 3pm

There has always been a strong fascinating relationship between herbs, folklore and
even witchcraft in this country and in the rest of the world.

Wise women and shamans often took the role of doctors in tribes and small rural villages
using herbal remedies to cure physical and supernatural afflictions.

From the mandrake's scream to witches unguent, join us for a talk on medicine & magic among The smells and spells of our atmopsheric garret.

For Children

The Ghost Ward Trail...

.An eerie exploration of mysterious medicine
Take a map and follow the trail around the museum to uncover
the horrors of the hospitals of the past....

Macabre Medicine

Tuesday 27th October at 11am and 3pm

Wednesday 28th October at 11am, 2pm and 3pm

Friday 30th October at 11am, 2pm and 3pm

Saturday 31st October - Halloween - at 11am

Stories and activities for young witches and warlocks
...will the ghostly grey lady appear?

For the Adults

Saturday 24th October at 2pm
Tales of the Bodysnatcher
(not suitable for the under 12s)

Nineteenth Century surgical techniques advanced with knowledge gained by anatomical dissection.

Thursday 29th October 6pm-8pm
WITCHCRAFT, Women & Wickedness
a talk by Michael Doolan

This talk will discuss Anthropological approaches to magic and ritual.
Ideas from psychoanalysis will be used in an exploration of witchcraft
as an historical and contemporary social phenomenon.

This talk is not suitable for children
Contains material that some people may find upsetting

Tuesday 3rd November at 6.30pm

Autopsy: Myths, Legends and the Reality’

a talk by pathologist Maesha Deheragoda

For National Patyhology Week 2009

Are autopsies just like how they are shown on TV, or is there more to it?
At this interactive event, you will have the opportunity to engage with a pathologist who performs autopsies and find out how they help doctors understand more about disease, as well as treat living patients.

You’ll also have the chance to handle the instruments used in autopsies and work out what they are used for!

Saturday 19th and Sunday 20th September

Open House

Open House London is the Capital's largest architectural showcase, where 700 buildings of every conceivable type, shape and size will open their doors to Londoners completely for free.

The Old Operating Theatre Museum and Herb Garret are taking part in Open House again this year. Cathedral Group will also be opening the Church of St Thomas for the first time this year on Saturday 19th October.

Further information about London Open House is available at:

The OPEN HOUSE website

Click here for archive of 08 events

FEBRUARY EVENTS

Click here for March Events

In House-Exhibitions/Art Installation

THIS FATAL SUBJECT - 28th January - 29th February

Click here for further details

Live Demonstrations and workshops

Speed Surgery - Surgery in the 19th Century

Every Saturday 2.00pm

Click here for details

Herbs, the Garret and Operating Theatre

Every Sunday 2.00pm

Click here for details

Half Term Events (16th - 20th February)

Victorian Surgery

Monday 16th February 2.00pm

Victorian Surgery

Tuesday 17th February 2.00pm

SHEEP, SNAILS AND SHELLFISH

Wednesday 18th February 2.00pm

Click here for details

SHEEP, SNAILS AND SHELLFISH

Friday 19th February 2.00pm

Click here for details

Speed Surgery

Saturday 20th February 11.00am

Click here for details

Speed Surgery

Saturday 20th February 2.00pm

Click here for details

Speed Surgery

Saturday 20th February 3.00pm

Click here for details

   
Is it Scary - click here

 

 

 

DETAILS OF FEBRUARY EVENTS

Live Demonstrations and workshops

Speed Surgery - Every Saturday in February at 2.00 pm

A Live Demonstration of Surgery before Anaesthesia.

"I have broken my arm - I am a dead man!"

Demonstrations of Victorian Surgery, when operations were performed without anaesthesia and a patient's only relief from agony was the skill of the surgeon's knife.

Herbs, the Garret and Operating Theatre - Every Sunday in February 2.00 pm

A talk on the fascinating history of the Museum and its medical heritage.

VICTORIAN SURGERY

Monday 16th February and Tuesday 17th February

at 2pm

“A patient preparing for an operation was like a condemned criminal preparing for execution.”
A demonstration of an operation without anaesthetics or antiseptics, in Britain’s only remaining wooden 19th century Operating Theatre.
How will you survive...?


SHEEP, SNAILS AND SHELLFISH

Bizarre prescriptions & remedies that involved animals in ancient times .
Can a crocodile turn into a miraculous cure?

A workshop for kids that adults will love.


SPEED SURGERY

Saturday 21st February

at 11am, 2pm and 3pm

"I have broken my arm - I am a dead man!"

Demonstrations of Victorian Surgery, when operations were performed without anaesthesia and a patient's only relief from agony was the skill of the surgeon's knife.

A real amputation kit awaits...!

How will you survive?

In House-Exhibitions/Art Installations

THIS FATAL SUBJECT - 28th January - 29th February

A WELLCOME TRUST ARTS AWARD FUNDED PROJECT

by Gordon Museum Artists in Residence, visual artist Susan Aldworth wax sculptor Eleanor Crook, and Writer in Residence, poet Valerie Laws

This Fatal Subject is a very exciting and innovative project, in which the three resident artists, with the help and support of Professor Susan Standring at KCL and Bill Edwards at the Gordon Museum, are working with scientists at KCL and elsewhere, researching the physical process of dying.

This show consists of a few examples of individual and collaborative work, some of which are works in progress. Some notes on what is on display follow below.

FILM: CELL SUICIDE: A PLEASURE POSTPONED

Animated film by Susan Aldworth, animation and sound by Barney Quinton, featuring a visual poem which undergoes apoptosis by Valerie Laws. This collaboration, still in development, arose from our individual researches into the topic of programmed cell death.

ETCHINGS by Susan Aldworth

Apoptosis 1&2: etchings inspired by microphotographs of apoptotic cells. Original prints: etching and aquatint 35 x 50 cms

Dissollution 1,2&3: a triptych about the dissolution of identity from changes in the brain for people with Alzheimer’s. Original prints: etching and aquatint 65 x 50 cm

POEMS by Valerie Laws, artwork by Susan Aldworth

Litter of Moons, (shown by kind permission of Mslexia magazine), and Sirenomelia were inspired by specimens at the Gordon Museum. Benign and Leang Yen are about Lam Qua’s paintings, one of which is in the Gordon, the other at Yale. In the Dissection Room follows visits to dissection at KCL. From Fin to Fingers is on the theme of Apoptosis in the foetus.

WAX SCULPTURES by Eleanor Crook

The Failing Consciousness 2008. Work in progress – the sculpture will be cast in silicone rubber and fitted with an animatronic mechanism making it able to speak a deathbed speech written by Valerie Laws, then die.

This show represents the climax of Phase One of the project, which has been funded by the Wellcome Trust as a Research and Development Arts Award. During this year, the artists made contact with scientists, forged working relationships, and shared their research findings into this vital, and fatal subject. They have been collecting material and information for their work, and developing their artistic practices too. Aldworth, Laws and Crook work as three individual practitioners, but are also developing collaborative work which breaks down barriers between their different art forms.

Phase Two of This Fatal Subject is planned to begin in 2009, culminating in production of groundbreaking individual and collaborative work on the science of dying, which will form public exhibitions in London and elsewhere, as well as publication and performance. You will find updates on Phase Two on the website, www.thisfatalsubject.org. See also www.susanaldworth.com and www.valerielaws.co.uk.

March 2009 Events

May Events

National Family Week

family learning logo and link

Monday 25th
14.00 Calling all Surgical Cubs!
 Attend this family event with an iron will and strong stomach.Without anaesthesia amputation would have to be swift. St Thomas’ and Guy’s Hospital surgeons were strong and taught students to give mercy to the patient and remove the limb as quickly as possible.  Within the old operating theatre of 1822, the demonstrator will show harsh, but essential surgical methods using an original 19th Century surgical kit.


15.00 Speed Surgery
A surgical demonstration presented within the original architecture of the old operating theatre of St. Thomas’s Hospital of 1822. Before the advent of anaesthesia, an operation had to be swift. Without hand-washing or antiseptics, the chance of later infection was inevitable.

Tuesday 26th
14.00 The Apothecary Shop
As a trainee Apothecary (pharmacist of the 18th Century) you would have had to assess patients and create remedies. In the attic of St Thomas' Church take the chance to train as an apothecary, grind your own medicines, roll pills and discover weirdly wonderful tonics like Snail Water, but remember these are not just make-believe, these are real remedies of the past.

15.00 Speed Surgery
A surgical demonstration presented within the original architecture of the old operating theatre of St. Thomas’s Hospital of 1822. Before the advent of anaesthesia, an operation had to be swift. Without hand-washing or antiseptics, the chance of later infection was inevitable

Wednesday 27th
14.00 Calling all Surgical Cubs!
 Attend this family event with an iron will and strong stomach.Without anaesthesia amputation would have to be swift. St Thomas’ and Guy’s Hospital surgeons were strong and taught students to give mercy to the patient and remove the limb as quickly as possible.  Within the old operating theatre of 1822, the demonstrator will show harsh, but essential surgical methods using an original 19th Century surgical kit.

15.00 Speed Surgery
A surgical demonstration presented within the original architecture of the old operating theatre of St. Thomas’s Hospital of 1822. Before the advent of anaesthesia, an operation had to be swift. Without hand-washing or antiseptics, the chance of later infection was inevitable

Thursday 28th
14.00 Herbal Hospital
The hard work and passion of the apothecary and his poor assistants.
A demonstration of simple, effective, ancient processes for the transformation of herbs into medicine. Tablets, pills, poultices made the medical world go around…

15.00 Speed Surgery
A surgical demonstration presented within the original architecture of the old operating theatre of St. Thomas’s Hospital of 1822. Before the advent of anaesthesia, an operation had to be swift. Without hand-washing or antiseptics, the chance of later infection was inevitable.

Friday 29th
14.00 The Apothecary Shop
As a trainee Apothecary (pharmacist of the 18th Century) you would have had to assess patients and create remedies. In the attic of St Thomas' Church take the chance to train as an apothecary, grind your own medicines, roll pills and discover weirdly wonderful tonics like Snail Water, but remember these are not just make-believe, these are real remedies of the past.

15.00 Speed Surgery
A surgical demonstration presented within the original architecture of the old operating theatre of St. Thomas’s Hospital of 1822. Before the advent of anaesthesia, an operation had to be swift. Without hand-washing or antiseptics, the chance of later infection was inevitable

Saturday 30th

14.00 Victorian Surgery
Your leg is broken…it must be removed.
Bring in the surgeon, the instruments, the vicious tools of healing.
Three knives, a saw in a crimson velvet lined box…
How will you survive?

15.00 Herbal Hospital

The hard work and passion of the apothecary and his poor assistants.
A demonstration of simple, effective, ancient processes for the transformation of herbs into medicine. Tablets, pills, poultices made the medical world go around…

Saturday 6th June at 2.00pm
Part of 'Walking Weekend'
'The Story of Guys, St Thomas & Medicine in Southwark Guided Walk'
A walk through the history of two of the most important charitable hospitals of Victorian London.
The walk starts at the Old Operating Theatre Museum with a demonstration of 19th Century Surgery and a visit to the museum's Herb Garret and ends at the near-by Guy’s Hospital.

Saturday 13th June, at 1.00, 2.00 & 3.00 pm
"Leeches, Lancets and Toothpulling"
with Colonial Surgeon Richard Kennedy
Richard Kennedy is an author and historian who will talk about the differences in
the practice of medicine in the American colonies and the practice in London during
the same era. He will demonstrate the use of leeches, saws and chisels for amputation
without anaesthesia and the "latest" devices used for rotted teeth.

Saturday 13th June from 2.00 pm
Part of  'London on Film Weekend'
"The Old Operating Theatre Museum on Film, TV and Video"
A selection of appearances of the Operating Theatre in documentaries
and films will be projected from 2pm onwards.

Live Demonstrations and workshops

Speed Surgery - Every Saturday at 2.00 pm

A Live Demonstration of Surgery before Anaesthesia

Herbs, the Garret and Operating Theatre - Every Sunday 2.00 pm

A talk on the fascinating history of the Museum and its medical heritage.

Other events to be announced.